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Need dinner inspiration? Try this Ethiopian recipe

January 25, 2016 4:52 pm

Ethiopian food is probably best known for the spongy sourdough flatbread called injera, which serves as the “spoon” for lentil, bean, meat, and vegetable sauces piled on top. The country’s food characteristically consists of vegetable and often very spicy meat dishes.

Doro Wat and Injera Recipe

chicken-406111_960_720Doro which means chicken and Wot (or wet or watt) meaning sauce, is the national dish of Ethiopia. This super slow cooked spicy chicken stew uses the famous Berbere spice, that gives it its fantastic colour and flavour. A huge amount of finely chopped onions (for Western standards that is) is used to create this masterpiece. Note, you cannot make this dish quickly, it is all about low ‘n slow cooking.

For the Doro Wat

3 pounds boneless chicken, breasts and thighs, cut into 1 inch cubes
2 large onions, chopped
4 cloves garlic, minced
2 sticks (1 cup) butter
1 cup red wine
2 cups water
2 teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon ground cardamom
2 tablespoons garam masala
1/3 cup hot smoked paprika
1 tablespoon crushed red pepper
2 teaspoons fenugreek seeds
1 tablespoon dried thyme
3 tablespoons tomato paste
1 tablespoon sugar
1 lime, juiced

For the Injera

This amazing sourdough flat bread is served with pretty much all Ethiopian food. It is made from tef (teff) a tiny grain that is gluten free. To make Injera or Enjera is not that easy but once you get the hang of it is a breeze. Tef can be hard to get hold of and there are other ways of making injera like, rice flour, wheat flour and so on.

3 cups all-purpose flour
1 cup buckwheat flour
2 tablespoons baking soda
1 teaspoon salt
4 cups club soda
1 cup white or rice vinegar
Oil for pan

Directions

1. For the Doro Wat: Place all the ingredients, minus the lime juice, in a slow cooker and cover. Cook for 4-6 hours–depending on your slow cooker settings–until the chicken is tender. Then mash the chicken to shreds with a potato masher (or the bottom of a ladle.) Stir in the lime juice and keep warm.
2. For the Injera Recipe: In a large bowl, mix both flours, salt and baking soda together. Whisk in the club soda until smooth. Then add the vinegar and whisk.
3. Heat a large skillet over medium heat. Pour oil on a paper towel and wipe the skillet with the oiled paper towel.
4. Using a scoop, pour batter into the skillet creating a 6 inch circle. Carefully swirl the pan around to thin out the batter until it measures 8-9 inches across.
5. Cook for 1 minute, then using a large spatula, flip the Injera over and cook another minute. Remove from the skillet and stack on a plate. Repeat with remaining batter. The Injera will seem slightly crisp in the pan, but will soften immediately when placed on the plate.
6. Once finished cooking the Injera. Cut the circles in half with a pizza cutter, roll into tubes and stack. Keep warm until ready to serve. Serve the Doro Wat and Injera together, tearing piece of Injera and using it to pick up the Doro Wat.

SERVES: 8 servings

PREP TIME: 30 minutes

COOK TIME: 6 minutes

Need dinner inspiration? Try this Ethiopian recipe Reviewed by on . Ethiopian food is probably best known for the spongy sourdough flatbread called injera, which serves as the “spoon” for lentil, bean, meat, and vegetable sauces Ethiopian food is probably best known for the spongy sourdough flatbread called injera, which serves as the “spoon” for lentil, bean, meat, and vegetable sauces Rating: 0
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