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Women football and society in Africa

August 25, 2018 7:55 am

African women’s sides continue to suffer underfunding across the continent, despite on-field improvement. Women football and society in Africa are at war.

 

The women’s game appeared to have made a huge leap on the pitch, but with prize money negligible, the players are still competing for pride.

 

Stigma

African players are still facing stigma and misogynistic abuse. Players abandon the African leagues for overseas clubs, and the problem is lack of sponsorship, motivation and poor welfare.

 

Is football a boys’ game?

30 million girls and women play football worldwide, but in some countries, they are also questioned, are accused of being manly and banned from the pitch. Is football a boys’ game or a girls’ game? The question may seem old-fashioned in certain parts of the world. After all, football is one of the most popular female sports, with some 30 million girls and women playing it worldwide, according to football-governing body FIFA.

 

Recorded stereotypes

But in some countries, girls are not allowed to play. In others, they are discriminated against or accused of being manly. Most come up against cultural stereotypes, even at an institutional level. Former FIFA President Joseph Blatter asked women to wear tighter uniforms to make their games more commercial, while Italy’s former president of the amateur football association referred to female players as a ‘bunch of lesbians’.

 

Things to note:

  • Women footballers earn much less than their male counterparts.
  • How women’s soccer is constructed in present times is influenced by historical events.
  • Gender inequality in soccer goes back to the beginning of the 19th
  • At the beginning of the 19th-century women’s soccer made its advance in Norway and the Netherlands, the public opinion was not half as positive as it is today: both countries were fed up with setbacks due to the dominant view that soccer was a sport for men.
  • Women’s football has a brighter future but playground stereotypes still need to be tackled.
  • Parents are being encouraged to change the culture of only boys playing football.

 

Author: Gesture Chidhanguro

 

Women football and society in Africa Reviewed by on . African women's sides continue to suffer underfunding across the continent, despite on-field improvement. Women football and society in Africa are at war. African women's sides continue to suffer underfunding across the continent, despite on-field improvement. Women football and society in Africa are at war. Rating: 0
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